Approximately 5-7% of patients carry genetic DPYD variants

Approximately 5-7% of patients carry genetic DPYD variants that cause DPD deficiency and reduce metabolic elimination of fluoropyrimidine based chemotherapy (fluorouracil, aka 5-FU, and capecitabine/Xeloda). These drugs are commonly used to treat patients with colorectal/anal, pancreatic, breast, head and neck cancers.

If these patients receive standard doses, they are at a significant risk of severe toxic reaction (50%-80% risk) that could lead to hospitalization, treatment delays, and possibly even death (2%-4% risk).

HOW TO BE SAFE

You Can Minimize Your Risk Of Severe Toxicity

You Can Minimize Your Risk Of Severe Toxicity

by undergoing DPYD genetic testing prior to the start of fluoropyrimidine based chemotherapy.

Complete DPD Deficiency

If you have complete DPD deficiency (a more rare condition), you should AVOID treatment using fluoropyrimidines.

Partial DPD Deficiency

If you have partial DPD deficiency, you most likely are unaware of this condition so it best serves your interest to test for the condition prior to treatment. If test results indicate DPD deficiency, your oncologist may reduce your starting capecitabine dose 25%-50% (following CPIC guidelines), followed by dose adjustment based on your ability to tolerate treatment.

HOW TO GET TESTED

You Will Need To Ask Your Oncologist To Order This Test.

You Will Need To Ask Your Oncologist To Order This Test.

If your oncologist is unfamiliar with DPYD laboratory tests, please share with them the information compiled in this worksheet on DPD/DPYD Test/Laboratory Data.

Use this Quick Reference guide on how to understand the content of the laboratory tests identified in the worksheet.

Ordering this test is not standard of care in the US, though it is in most of Europe. Your doctor can find a list of CLIA-approved tests within the NCBI Genetic Testing Registry. Testing may be covered by your insurance or may cost $200-$500.